Empowering Educators to Help Young People Think Critically About Porn

Empowering Educators to Help Young People Think Critically About Porn

This event aims to provide those working with young people a constructively critical focus on talking about porn and the place that it is – undeniably – assuming in our (online and offline) culture. Expert contributors (names TBC) will give their perspectives on:

*scale and nature of the porn ‘industry’
*evidence-based patterns of consumption by young people
*impacts on emotional & psychological development, self-image and notions of ‘real’ and ‘unreal’ relating to sexual relationships
*talking about porn in school as part of the RSE 2020 expectation
*the conflicting ideological / political / ethical perspectives around porn

Porn is a complex cluster of phenomena around which there are, understandably, many sensitivities which – in educational and youth work settings – can make the work of concerned and supportive professionals challenging. Perspectives on porn differ widely through society, with diverse viewpoints expressed along political, ideological, religious and cultural lines. The certainty is that porn will be encountered by almost all young people in their development as digital citizens. How they respond to that exposure – and how they critically understand its impact on them and society – depends to varying extents on how they are supported by influential adults.

The more that professionals are prepared and confident to support them in age-appropriate ways, as part of curricular programmes and/or as part of pastoral support, safeguarding and mentoring, the better. Knowledge is power, as they say, and this event is aimed at increasing your knowledge about how to support young people. Ignoring porn as a social fact is not a realistic option and we owe it to our young people to be equipped to have serious and informed discussion about it. We also owe it to ourselves as professionals to seek opportunities, with peers, to develop the necessary skills and knowledge. As James Baldwin said: ‘Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. ‘

The event is aimed primarily at educators and youth-focused professionals but is open to all with an interest in supporting young people (with a particular but not exclusive emphasis on boys and young men) to navigate their way safely and respectfully through a human landscape deeply impacted – and increasingly shaped – by porn.

This event aims to provide those working with young people a constructively critical focus on talking about porn and the place that it is – undeniably – assuming in our (online and offline) culture. Expert contributors (names TBC) will give their perspectives on:

*scale and nature of the porn ‘industry’
*evidence-based patterns of consumption by young people
*impacts on emotional & psychological development, self-image and notions of ‘real’ and ‘unreal’ relating to sexual relationships
*talking about porn in school as part of the RSE 2020 expectation
*the conflicting ideological / political / ethical perspectives around porn

Porn is a complex cluster of phenomena around which there are, understandably, many sensitivities which – in educational and youth work settings – can make the work of concerned and supportive professionals challenging. Perspectives on porn differ widely through society, with diverse viewpoints expressed along political, ideological, religious and cultural lines. The certainty is that porn will be encountered by almost all young people in their development as digital citizens. How they respond to that exposure – and how they critically understand its impact on them and society – depends to varying extents on how they are supported by influential adults.

The more that professionals are prepared and confident to support them in age-appropriate ways, as part of curricular programmes and/or as part of pastoral support, safeguarding and mentoring, the better. Knowledge is power, as they say, and this event is aimed at increasing your knowledge about how to support young people. Ignoring porn as a social fact is not a realistic option and we owe it to our young people to be equipped to have serious and informed discussion about it. We also owe it to ourselves as professionals to seek opportunities, with peers, to develop the necessary skills and knowledge. As James Baldwin said: ‘Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. ‘

The event is aimed primarily at educators and youth-focused professionals but is open to all with an interest in supporting young people (with a particular but not exclusive emphasis on boys and young men) to navigate their way safely and respectfully through a human landscape deeply impacted – and increasingly shaped – by porn.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/empowering-educators-to-help-young-people-think-critically-about-porn-tickets-116885619033?fbclid=IwAR1Gl5OT3JWa6k4cJIORVMjGA8nyiXvUuGxj67dlMSRRB6nCJegbX8fMPpQ

Leave a Reply